EARTH SCIENCE LAB
Remote Sensing


PART I: Photographs

Determine the type of aerial photograph (image) found in the following figures or pages from the textbook.

Click on the image for a larger view and caption.

Northern Illinois
Northern Illinois
Chicago
Chicago, Illinois
Flooding in North Carolina
Image courtesy of
U.S. Geological Survey
Vertical
Low Oblique
High Oblique
Vertical
Low Oblique
High Oblique
Vertical
Low Oblique
High Oblique

Click on the image for a larger view and caption.

Quad Cities area
Image courtesy of NASA
Flooding in North Carolina
Image courtesy of
U.S. Geological Survey
Pikes Peak area, Colorado
Image courtesy of NASA
Vertical
Low Oblique
High Oblique
Vertical
Low Oblique
High Oblique
Vertical
Low Oblique
High Oblique

Click on the image for a larger view and caption.

Sangre de Cristo mountains, Colorado
Image courtesy of NASA
Flooding in North Carolina
Image courtesy of
U.S. Geological Survey
Flooding in North Carolina
Image courtesy of
U.S. Geological Survey
Vertical
Low Oblique
High Oblique
Vertical
Low Oblique
High Oblique
Vertical
Low Oblique
High Oblique

PART II: Stereoscopic Viewing

Stereoscopic viewing allows three-dimensional views of aerial photographs. To do this properly it is necessary to have a stereoviewer. The thumbnail image below is small enough that the technique described in the Stereogram section can be used to view this in 3-D. The problem with this method is that there is a loss of detail. A larger version of the image is available by clicking on the image. To see this in 3-D will require stereoviewers. These are available on campus in the Science Resource Lab.

Stereo pair
Image courtesy of U.S. Geological Survey

PART III: Aerial Photographic Interpretation

In the following problems you will be examining common man-made surface features and geologic landscapes. Our normal perspective is that of viewing the surface of the Earth from the surface. In aerial photographs the perspective is perpendicular to the surface. Familiar objects become unfamiliar, but can be recognized with a little practice and patience. The trick is to try and picture a familiar object as it would appear from above. Look for clues such as roads, rivers, and buildings. The shape is often the most important information. Beware, trees do not look like trees from above. Shadows cast by the sun are also important in helping to determine the size and shape of surface features.

Use the image below to answer the following questions.

Neighborhood in Moline, near Black Hawk College
Image courtesy of City of Moline

North is to the top of the image. From what direction is the sunlight coming?

N NNE NE ENE
E ESE SE SSE
S SSW SW WSW
W WNW NW NNW

Infrared Photography

Examine the information on the web page linked below. Answer the following questions.
Aerial Photography and Remote Sensing

Describe the relationship between visible colors of objects and the color seen in infrared photographs.
.
.
.

Stereograms

Examine the stereogram below. Describe, using only one word, the shape seen in this image. Directions for seeing this type of image are given below.

DIRECTIONS: Many people have difficulty seeing these types of pictures. There is a trick to it and it does require a bit of skill and patience. One way to see the objects is described here. Stand or sit directly in front of the image (it can be done from an angle but only by people that are skilled in viewing this type of image). Stare at the two dots at the top of the poster. The trick is to bring these two dots together so that they appear to be one dot. The easiest way to do this is to start fairly close to the image (for some people this will be so close that your nose almost touches the screen). Let your eyes relax and the image go blurry. Pretend that you are looking at a very distant object. With a bit of luck the dots will come together. Now the hard part is to slowly back away from the screen until you can focus on it - Don't loose sight of the dot. Once this happens you should be able to look at all parts of the image normally. Don't get discouraged if you loose the image the first few times. It takes practice and a lot of patience for some people.

Stereogram #1
(HINT: The word is in the stereogram!)

Stereogram #1
(HINT: The word is in the stereogram!)